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LIVING WITH MOSHIACH
Weekly Digest About Moshiach

Parshat Noach, 5767
5 Cheshvan, 5767
Oct. 27, 2006

SPECIAL FEATURE:
The Seven Noachide Laws


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TABLE OF CONTENTS:

NOTE:
The Table of Contents contains links to the text. Click on an entry in the Table of Contents and you will move to the information selected.

"I BELIEVE WITH COMPLETE FAITH IN THE ARRIVAL OF THE MOSHIACH.

"AND THOUGH HE MAY TARRY, I SHALL WAIT EACH DAY, ANTICIPATING HIS ARRIVAL."

Maimonides, Principles of the Faith, No. 12

THIS PUBLICATION IS DEDICATED
TO THE REBBE,
RABBI MENACHEM M. SCHNEERSON
OF LUBAVITCH

Click here, to see pictures of the Rebbe
The Daily Sicha (in Real Audio) - Listen to selected excerpts of the Rebbe's Sichos
[talks] which are relevant to the particular day.

INTRODUCTION

We are pleased to present, to the visually impaired and the blind, the 498th issue of our weekly publication, Living With Moshiach.

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In this week's issue, we focus on The Seven Noachide Laws.

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Our sincere appreciation to L'Chaim weekly publication, published by the Lubavitch Youth Organization, for allowing us to use their material.

Also, many thanks to our copy editor, Reb Mordechai Staiman, of blessed memory, for his tireless efforts.

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It is our fervent hope that our learning about Moshiach and the Redemption will hasten the coming of Moshiach, NOW!

Rabbi Yosef Y. Shagalov
Administrator
Committee for the Blind

30 Tishrei, 5767
Los Angeles, California

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
Horav Schneur Zalman Halevi
ben Horav Yitzchok Elchonon Halevi
Shagalov
Passed away on 21 Tamuz, 5766

Reb Dovid Asniel ben Reb Eliyahu
Ekman
Passed away on 5 Sivan - Erev Shavuot, 5765

Mrs. Devora Rivka bas Reb Yosef Eliezer
Marenburg
Passed away on the second day
of Rosh Chodesh Adar, 5766

AND IN HONOR OF
Mrs. Esther Shaindel bas Fraidel Chedva
Shagalov

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Dedicated by their children
Rabbi & Mrs. Yosef Yitzchok and Gittel Rochel
Shagalov

THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Adapted from the Works of the Rebbe

Parshat Noach

The(1) Shabbat when we read the Torah portion of Noach is of general importance, for it is the first Shabbat after the week following Shabbat Bereishis, which concludes the Hebrew month of Tishrei. It is in this week that the Jews begin their service within the context of mundane activities. In this context, the name of this week's portion, Noach is also significant. Noach in Hebrew is identified with rest and satisfaction, for this service should arouse such feelings.

In this context, we can appreciate the contrast between Shabbat Bereishis and Shabbat Noach. The Zohar states that all the days of the following week are blessed from the previous Shabbat. Thus Shabbat Bereishis represents the blessing for the first week of ordinary mundane activity in the new year. Shabbat Noach represents the conclusion of this week, the day which infuses rest and perfection into this service. Thus Shabbat Bereishis can be considered as the source of potential, while it is on Shabbat Noach that we see how this potential is brought into actual expression.

There is another common, yet contrasting dimension to the Sabbaths of Bereishis and Noach. Both portions are related to the existence of the world as a whole. The portion of Bereishis describes the creation of the world and Noach contains G-d's promise that the world will continue to exist forever.

There is, however, a distinct contrast between the two portions. Bereishis describes the world as it exists as a complete and perfect entity, the world as G-d conceived of it and created it. The portion of Noach, in contrast, describes the world after the descent into sin and the state of perfection that can be reached through the service of man who turns to G-d in teshuvah (repentance). Through this service, man generates satisfaction and pleasure for G-d, as it were, fulfilling His desire to have a dwelling in the lower worlds.

To use different terminology, the portion of Bereishis reflects G-d's conception of the world -- the potential. The portion of Noach, in contrast, reflects man's service within the world as it actually exists. This can involve, as indeed, it is reflected in the beginning of the portion of Noach, a tremendous descent. Nevertheless, the ultimate result of this service is that the world is brought to a higher level of refinement and purity. This is reflected in the Midrash's statement, "Noach saw a new world."

The service of man relates to a higher level of G-dliness as is reflected in the contrast between the two Torah portions. In the beginning of Bereishis, when the Torah refers to G-d, it uses the name Elokim. Elokim is numerically equal [86] to "hateva -- the nature" and is described as "the Master of potential and power," i.e., the dimension of G-dliness which brings our limited world into being.

In contrast, in regard to Noach, the Torah states "And Noach found favor in the eyes of Havaya," i.e., he revealed a level of G-dliness above the natural order within the world. Furthermore, this leads to the potential that Havaya will be fused with Elokim, that within the natural limits of the world, the name Havaya which reveals G-dliness above those limits will be revealed.

This fusion of Elokim and Havaya is reflected in the covenant G-d established with Noach regarding the existence of the world, that the natural order would continue without interruption. For the maintenance of the natural order is a reflection of G-d's infinite power, i.e., the lack of change in the natural order is a reflection of how "I G-d have not changed."

And from the portion of Noach, we proceed to the portion of Lech Lecha, which begins with the command "Go out" -- i.e., that a person must leave his previous spiritual level -- and proceed to "the land which I will show you." Moreover, the expression "I will show you," ar'echa in Hebrew, can also be rendered "I will reveal you," i.e., the Jew's essential self will be revealed. For it is through the service in refining this earthly plane, that a Jew reveals his true potential. Regardless of a Jew's position in the world, he is connected with G-dliness and thus he can elevate the world, revealing G-dliness within it. And in this manner, he relates to a higher level of G-dliness and is able to draw down even this level within the world.

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1. Translated/adapted by Sichos In English From a talk of the Rebbe, on 4 Marcheshvan, 5752/1991.

THE REBBE'S PROPHECY

The Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson of Lubavitch, issued a call that "The time of our Redemption has arrived!" and "Moshiach is on his way!"

The Rebbe stressed that he is saying this as a prophecy, and asks us all to prepare ourselves for the Redemption, through increasing acts of goodness and kindness.

Let us all heed the Rebbe's call.

IN LOVING MEMORY OF OUR DEAR FRIEND AND COPY EDITOR
Reb Mordechai ben Reb Shaul
Staiman

Passed away on 22 Tamuz, 5763

MOSHIACH MATTERS (1)

A Chasid once asked Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the third Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch, known as the Tzemach Tzedek, whether he should settle in the land of Israel. There he would devote his life to Torah study and mitzvah observance.

The Tzemach Tzedek replied, "Make the place where you are into the Holy Land."

What does that response mean?

To answer, we must first understand what is Eretz Yisrael, the Holy Land. The Holy Land is a place where G-dliness, holiness and Judaism are openly revealed. In an ultimate sense, this will be realized in the Messianic Era when the third Holy Temple will be rebuilt and the observance of all the commandments associated with holiness of the land will be restored.

This is the essence of the Messianic Era. The relationship between man and G-d will no longer be based on faith alone, but will also be nourished by a first-hand awareness of G-d's Presence here on earth. The physical setting of the world will not change in the era of Redemption. What will be different is our knowledge and awareness of G-d.

The directive "Make this place the Holy Land" means that every individual should and can draw G-dliness into his life and into his environment.

Each of us should know that one's "place," that is, each dimension of our environment and each moment of time we experience can be transformed into the Holy Land, into a place where G-dliness is openly revealed. 

THE SEVEN NOACHIDE LAWS

This week's Torah portion is Noach. Therefore, this is the perfect opportunity to consider the implications of the Rebbe's campaign to disseminate, among non-Jews, the knowledge and observance of the Seven Noachide Laws.

The nations of the world were given a Divine code of conduct, the Seven Noachide Laws, which consist of six prohibitions against: adultery, murder, robbery, idolatry, blasphemy, cruelty to animals -- and one positive command, to establish a judicial system.

The Rebbe has encouraged his emissaries around the world to meet with governmental officials and heads of state to sign proclamations, encouraging the study and observance of the Seven Noachide laws. Governmental proclamations, however, are not the Rebbe's only concern.

An important part of the Jew's task is to see to it that all people, not just Jews, acknowledge G-d as Creator and Ruler of the world and to therefore conduct themselves according to the Seven Noachide Laws. Each and every Jew has an important role to play in this task. But how can this be accomplished?

When a Jew conducts himself properly in all areas of his life -- business, recreation, family, and religious -- he will automatically influence the people around him. When the nations of the world see Jews acknowledging G-d as Ruler of the world, through prayer and by following His commandments, they, too, will come to realize the importance and truth of G-d's omnipotence.

MOSHIACH MATTERS (2)

"The future Redemption will apply not only to Israel, but to the whole world as well. In preparation for this Redemption, therefore, action needs to be taken so that the world at large will be ready for such a state.

"This is to be achieved through the efforts of the Jewish people to influence the nations of the world to conduct themselves in the spirit of the verse that states that G-d 'formed the world in order that it be settled' (Isaiah 45:18) in a civilized manner, through the observance of their seven mitzvot."

The Rebbe, 5743/1983

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For more information about The Seven Noachide laws, go to: http://www.torah4blind.org/noahide.htm 

THE END OF EXILE IS NEAR! 

This week we read the Torah portion of Noach in which we find G-d's promise that the world will continue to exist forever; it will never end.

"The end is near." What does this phrase mean? Certainly not the end of the world but the end of the bitter days of exile. The end of oppression and hatred, poverty and sickness, war and crime.

Why should we be afraid that the end is approaching? Should that thought truly place fear in our hearts? Or should we not be excited that "the world will be filled with the knowledge of G-d as the waters cover the ocean"?

Fear is not necessarily the appropriate feeling. Rather, possibly a sense of regret, as the Previous Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneersohn, stated, "When Moshiach comes, then we will long for the days of exile." Why? Because at that time we will look back at a replay of our lives and see all of the instances when we could have done more good, more mitzvot, judged less harshly, been more generous. Thus, we might look toward the imminently approaching days of Moshiach with a little anxiety. But the positive anticipation should far outweigh our trepidation.

Would the Jews, from our greatest leaders to the simplest person, have looked forward to, longed for, prayed, begged and beseeched G-d for 2,000 years if the Redemption would not be good for everyone? In fact, we are told that this redemption for which we wait anxiously is called the "geula ha-amitit v'hashleima" -- the true and complete redemption -- because every single Jew, as well as all righteous gentiles, have a portion in the Redemption.

Let us take one more lesson from this week's Torah portion and relate it to the topic of Redemption as well. Noach was a tzaddik, a righteous person. But he had one major failing. He was commanded by G-d to build an ark, which he did obediently and gladly. But he did not actively seek to help the people of his generation return to G-d. He was content to save himself and his family.

Let us all make sure not only to prepare ourselves and to feel positive and anxious about the imminent redemption. Let us make sure to influence those in our surroundings as well.

TIME FOR UNITY;
TIME FOR STRENGTH!

The most important principle in the Torah is the protection of Jewish life.

It's more important than Shabbat, more important than holidays, even fasting on Yom Kippur.

Right now, in Israel, and everywhere, Jews must stand together in unity and do whatever possible to protect Jewish life.

The Rebbe teaches that there are ten important Mitzvot we can do to protect life. See what you can do:

1) Ahavat Yisroel: Behave with love towards another Jew.

2) Learn Torah: Join a Torah class.

3) Make sure that Jewish children get a Torah true education.

4) Affix kosher Mezuzot on all doorways of the house.

5) For men and boys over 13: Put on Tefillin every weekday.

6) Give Charity.

7) Buy Jewish holy books and learn them.

8) Light Shabbat & Yom Tov candles. A Mitzvah for women and girls.

9) Eat and drink only Kosher Food.

10) Observe the laws of Jewish Family Purity.

In addition the Rebbe urges that:

Every Jewish man, woman and child should have a letter written for them in a Sefer Torah.*

Every person should study either the Rambam's Yad Hachazakah -- Code of Jewish Law -- or the Sefer HaMitzvos.

Concerning Moshiach, the Rebbe stated, "The time for our redemption has arrived!" Everyone should prepare themselves for Moshiach's coming by doing random acts of goodness and kindness, and by studying about what the future redemption will be like. May we merit to see the fulfillment of the Rebbe's prophecy now!

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*. There are several Torah scrolls being written to unite Jewish people and protect Jewish life.

Letters for children can be purchased for only $1. Send your Hebrew name and your mother's Hebrew name plus $1 to:
"Children's Sefer Torah," P. O. Box 8, Kfar Chabad, 72915, Israel
or via the Internet, at: http://www.kidstorah.org

A CALL TO ACTION

The Rebbe's slogan is: "The main thing is the deed." We therefore present from the Rebbe's talks, suggestions of what we can do to complete his work of bringing the Redemption.

The Seven Universal Laws of Noah:

Influence non-Jews to observe the seven universal laws commanded to Noah and his descendants.

The Seven Noachide Laws consist of six prohibitions against: adultery, murder, robbery, idolatry, blasphemy, cruelty to animals -- and one positive command, to establish a judicial system.

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For more information about The Seven Noachide laws, go to: http://www.torah4blind.org/noahide.htm

THE WEEKLY SHABBAT CALENDAR

Jewish Women and Girls Light Shabbat Candles

For local candle lighting times:
consult your local Rabbi, Chabad-Lubavitch Center.
or: http://www.candlelightingtimes.org/shabbos

For a free candle lighting kit:
contact your local Chabad-Lubavitch Center.

For a listing of the Centers in your area:
http://www.candlelightingtimes.org/general/shluchim.html.
In the USA, call: 1-800-Lubavitch (1-800-582-2848).

Times shown are for Metro NY - NJ

Friday, Oct. 27, Erev Shabbat Parshat Noach:

  • Light Shabbat Candles,(2) by 5:41 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 28, Shabbat Parshat Noach:

  • Shabbat ends at nightfall, at 6:39 p.m.

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2. The Shabbat candles must be lit 18 minutes before sunset. It is prohibited and is a desecration of the Shabbat to light the candles after sunset.

Laws of Shabbat Candle Lighting for the Blind

Shabbat Candle Lighting Blessing

"Let There Be Light" - The Jewish Women's Guide to Lighting Shabbat Candles.


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