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Parshat Vayeira, 5762
Year of Hakhel

Cheshvan 16, 5762 * November 2, 2001

A Jewish Response To Terrorism

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Maimonides, Principles of the Faith, No. 12


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The Daily Sicha (in Real Audio) - Listen to selected excerpts of the Rebbe's Sichos
[talks] which are relevant to the particular day.


Thank G-d that, with the current issue, our weekly publication, Living With Moshiach, has begun its eighth year of publication.


At this time, we take the opportunity to thank our supporters, who have helped us publish this weekly publication.

May G-d bless them, with health, happiness and success in all of their endeavors.


On Shabbat Parshat Eikev, 5751 (August 3, 1991), the Rebbe spoke about the printing of Chasidus in braille for the blind.

The full text of the Rebbe's sichah (talk) was reprinted as an "Introduction" to Vol. 1 of the Moshiach - Holiday Series (Chanukah 5753/1992), and in "Living With Moshiach" Vol. 137.


Our sincere appreciation to L'Chaim weekly publication, published by the Lubavitch Youth Organization, for allowing us to use their material.

Also, many thanks to our copy editor, Reb Mordechai Staiman, for his tireless efforts.


It is our fervent hope that our learning about Moshiach and the Redemption will hasten the coming of Moshiach, NOW!

Rabbi Yosef Y. Shagalov,
Committee for the Blind

7 Cheshvan, 5762
Year of Hakhel
Brooklyn, New York


On the 28th of Nissan, 5750 (April 23, 1990) the Rebbe was notified that P.L.O. terrorists were threatening to attack various targets throughout the world. The following is the Rebbe's response, freely translated:

"I was notified that the P.L.O. has given instructions to all its branches worldwide to strike at targets throughout the world, G-d forbid.

"It is therefore necessary to invoke and emphasize the blessings from G-d to all Jews in all places, in all their needs. Primarily the most needed blessing is the miracle of the complete and perfect Redemption through Moshiach (whom we await every day that his coming not be delayed even as much as the blink of an eye). These blessings should be emphasized with complete trust and confidence, as well as with joy and gladness of heart.

"We should especially fulfill the directive of the Chabad Rebbes, 'Think good and it will be good.'

"This means that thinking positively causes the course of events to actually turn out good.

"This information should be utilized not to scare anyone, G-d forbid, but rather in the positive sense, to enhance the service of the Jewish people in the study of Torah and the observance of mitzvot.

"On the verse (Gen. 27:22), 'The voice is the voice of Jacob,' our Sages tell us that the power of the Jewish people is with 'our mouth.' Through our heartfelt prayers and Torah learning we can eliminate the plans of 'the hands of Esau,' the terrible schemes of our enemies.

"Thus there should be additional activities in Torah study and prayer and in mitzvot in general.

"Special emphasis should be placed on studying Torah diligently. For our Sages explain the verse, 'If you will follow my statutes' to mean that if you will labor in Torah... 'I will grant peace in the land. You will sleep without fear.'

"Through Torah study we eliminate all negative things and they are even transformed to good.

"Also, additional prayers should be said. Keeping with the spirit of 'thinking positive' it would be advisable to recite daily an extra three chapters of Psalms. One of these three chapters should be the final chapter of Psalms (ch. 150) which concludes with the verse, 'Let every being that has a soul praise G-d.' This means that every man, woman and child praises and gives thanks to G-d for His benevolence, and for the blessings and good fortune that He bestows upon us and will continue to bestow upon us.

"It would also be appropriate to add in the giving of charity.

"Although 'fasting' is out of place (especially in the context of 'thinking positive') this does not contradict the giving of charity to redeem a fast.

"It would be appropriate to give charity in the amount of two meals, and even better in the amount of three meals. This charity should preferably go to support people who learn Torah or institutions involved in disseminating Torah.

"Certainly these directives will be publicized in all Jewish communities, to all Jews, men, women and children.

"Emphasis must be placed however, to be very cautious not to scare anyone, G-d forbid. Rather, the purpose is to inspire everyone to enhance his/her Torah study and mitzvah observance, with true bitachon, complete trust and confidence in G-d, with joy and a glad heart.

"The main thing is that the resolutions regarding the above should hasten and quicken the concept of 'think good and it will be good' in actuality starting from the ultimate good -- the complete and perfect Redemption through Moshiach."


The Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson of Lubavitch, issued a call that "The time of our Redemption has arrived!" and "Moshiach is on his way!"

The Rebbe stressed that he is saying this as a prophecy, and asks us all to prepare ourselves for the Redemption, through increasing acts of goodness and kindness.

Let us all heed the Rebbe's call.


By the Grace of G-d
Rosh Chodesh Elul, 5736 (1976)
Brooklyn, N.Y.

To The Jewish Mothers and Daughters everywhere,
G-d bless you --

Blessing and Greeting:

In view of the recent events -- the hijacking and saving of the hostages held in Uganda; and the subsequent attempt of the terrorists to perpetrate a vicious reprisal, G-d forbid, in Kushta (Istanbul),

It should be understood that these events are an indication that Jews must, at the earliest possible, strengthen all aspects of their security and defenses -- first and foremost in their spiritual life, which is the channel to receive G-d's blessings also in the physical aspect, namely, to know the right ways and means that have to be undertaken in the natural order of things, and to fully succeed in these efforts, in accordance with the Divine promise, "G-d, your G-d, will bless you in all that you do" -- to be protected and secured from enemies, and to be spared any undesirable happenings, G-d forbid.

The above events remind each and all of our Jewish brethren in general, and Jewish mothers and daughters in particular -- since every married Jewish woman is called Akeres Habayis, "Foundation of the Home," and those not yet married are to be Akeres Habayis, for which they must prepare themselves from tender age -- the following:

The present situation calls for the protection of every Jewish home. True protection is that which only G-d provides, as it is written, "G-d guards the city." To ensure this Divine guardianship, the home has to be conducted in all aspects according to G-d's will.

Then the home is also an abode for the Shechinah (G-d's Presence), in accordance with His promise, "I will dwell among them."

In addition to this, G-d has given our people a special gift wherewith to protect the home, namely, the Mitzvah of Mezuzah. Our Sages declare explicitly that "the home is protected by it (the Mezuzah)."

Moreover, this protection embraces the members of the household also when they go out of the house, as it is written, 'G-d will guard your going and your coming from now and forever.' It is further explained in our holy sources that the Divine Name (Shin-Dalet-Yud) written on the back of the sacred Mezuzah parchment spells out the words, "Shomer Dalsos Yisroel -- Guardian of Jewish Doors."

Let it also be remembered that inasmuch as all Jews constitute one body, and are bound up with one another, every Mezuzah is a Divine protection not only for the individual home, with everybody and everything in it, but each additional kosher Mezuzah that is affixed on a doorpost of any Jewish home, anywhere, adds to the protection of all our people everywhere.

And considering -- as mentioned above -- that every Jewish housewife is an Akeres Habayis, and every Jewish girl a future Akeres Habayis, they have a special Zechus (merit) and responsibility in the matter of Mezuzah, to see to it that not only a kosher Mezuzah be affixed on every doorpost in their home that is required to have a Mezuzah, but that the same be done by their Jewish neighbors and friends, and in all Jewish homes.

I hope and pray that you will do this with inspiration and joy, which, in addition to increasing the Hatzlocho [success] in this effort, will also inspire many others to do likewise, and the Zechus Horabim [the merit you brought to the many] will further stand you in good stead.

The present time is particularly auspicious for this endeavor, as for endeavors in all matters of goodness and holiness, since we are in the beginning of the month of Elul -- the month of spiritual stocktaking, to complete the deficiencies of the outgoing year and to prepare for the New Year, that it be a good and blessed year for each and all of us and for our Jewish people as a whole.

With esteem and blessing of Kesivo veChasimo Tovah,

Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson


Jewish mystical teachings explain that evil has no permanence. Only good exists eternally and every good deed endures forever.

The way to fight evil, then, is with good, with everlasting and incessant good.

How much can you or I do to eradicate evil from the face of the earth, to wipe out terror and eliminate violence? Realistically speaking, how much of an impact can any one, single individual have on the entire world?

In the beginning of September, nearly four decades ago, the Rebbe addressed precisely this question in a pre High Holiday letter to Jews around the world.

"One single individual has the capacity to bring the whole of creation to fulfillment, as was the case with the first person, Adam....

"Our Sages teach us that the first person, Adam, was the prototype and example for each and every individual to follow: 'For this reason was man created as an individual in order to teach you that "one person equals a whole world," ' our Sages declared in the Mishna.

"This means that every Jew, regardless of time and place and personal status, has the fullest capacity, hence also duty, to rise and attain the highest degree of fulfillment, and accomplish the same for the creation as a whole.

"This disproves the contentions of those who do not fulfill their duty with the excuse that it is impossible to change the world; or that their parents had not given them the necessary education and preparation; or that the world is so huge, and one is so puny -- how can one hope to accomplish anything?

"There were times when the aforesaid idea, namely, the ability of a single individual to 'transform' the world, met with skepticism, and demanded proof.

"However, precisely in our generation, we unfortunately do not have to seek far to be convinced that one person could have such impact. We have seen how one individual brought the world to the brink of destruction, but for the mercies of the King of the Universe, Who ordained that 'the earth shall stand firm; shall not fall.'

"If such is the case in the realm of evil, surely one's potential is much greater in the realm of good. For, in truth, creation is essentially good, and therefore more inclined toward the good than its opposite."

So what can I do to fight evil? What contribution can I make in the war against terrorism? What is my memorial to the thousands who perished last month and the millions before them? I can be good, and so can you!


Do you have any money? No, this isn't a shake-down. But, if you have a U.S. one dollar bill, pull it out before continuing to read this article.

Being such an integral aspect of our lives, there must be something valuable money can teach us!

Turn to the side of the dollar bill that doesn't have the picture of George Washington. The most conspicuous item, you will notice, is the word, "ONE."

"One" is a very prominent concept in Judaism. A basic tenet of our faith is that G-d is one and there is nothing but G-d in the world -- the belief that nothing exists but G-d, or that everything exists only because of G-d is ultimate oneness.

Interestingly enough, the word "one" is directly below another major Jewish concept, "In G-d We Trust." The Jewish people's trust and faith in G-d has kept us going throughout the ages. This trust, however, is not limited to the Jewish people as a group, but encompasses our individual lives as well. Kabbala teaches -- and the Baal Shem Tov expounds on this teaching -- that we are never alone, G-d is always with us. Even in a person's darkest moments, G-d is with him and we can put our trust in Him, because each person is truly one with G-d.

The concept of the oneness of the entire universe is further reflected in the Latin phrase in the eagle's beak, "E Pluribus Unum," meaning, "From many you make one."

The eagle is holding arrows in one claw and what many horticulturists consider to be an olive branch in the other claw. This suggests the time of peace spoken about by our great prophet Isaiah when we will "beat our swords into plowshares..."

The number of arrowheads, the number of leaves on the olive branch, the number of stars above the eagle's head, are all 13. Thirteen, certainly, was the number of the original Colonies. But in addition, and perhaps not so coincidentally, it is the numerical equivalent of the Hebrew letters in the word echad, which means "one."

Also, the stars above the eagle's head, in the shape that has become known as a "Jewish star" and has become a symbol of Judaism, have light emanating from around them. The Jewish people were commanded by G-d to be "a light to the nations."

Let's look for a moment at the other sphere across from the eagle -- the one containing the pyramid. Two Latin phrases are in this circle. "Annuit Coeptis," according to the Webster dictionary, means, "He [G-d] has favored our undertaking." The second phrase, "Novus ordo seclorum," means "a new order of the ages," which in yesterday's lingo would be "a new world order" and in today's lingo "the Era of the Redemption."

The pyramid itself -- work of human beings -- is incomplete. It becomes complete only when joined with the eye, symbolizing most probably G-d's all-seeing Eye. It is only when we connect the work of our own hands with G-d and when we acknowledge G-d's assistance in our own work that we can complete our job. As G-d tells us, "Not through your courage nor through your strength, but with My spirit."

Just as the eagle symbolizes the United States, the pyramid is symbolic of a country -- though much more ancient than the USA. The pyramid is Egypt -- the location of the Jewish people's first exile. It is from Egypt that the first Redeemer, Moses, took us out and brought us to freedom and the Giving of the Torah. And it is from our last place of exile -- symbolized by the eagle -- that the call has come forth, "The time of our Redemption has arrived. Get ready for the coming of Moshiach."


"On the United States' currency it is written, 'In G-d We Trust.' Trust implies more than faith. It is faith so strong that one invests all that one has. Similarly, our faith in G-d must encompass our entire being."

(The Rebbe)


The most important principle in the Torah is the protection of Jewish life.

It's more important than Shabbat, more important than holidays, even fasting on Yom Kippur.

Right now, in Israel, and everywhere, Jews must stand together in unity and do whatever possible to protect Jewish life.

The Rebbe taught that there are ten important Mitzvot we can do to protect life. See what you can do:

1) Ahavat Yisroel: Behave with love towards another Jew.

2) Learn Torah: Join a Torah class.

3) Make sure that Jewish children get a Torah true education.

4) Affix kosher Mezuzot on all doorways of the house.

5) For men and boys over 13: Put on Tefillin every weekday.

6) Give Charity.

7) Buy Jewish holy books and learn them.

8) Light Shabbat & Yom tov candles. A Mitzvah for women and girls.

9) Eat and drink only Kosher Food.

10) Observe the laws of Jewish Family Purity.

In addition, the Rebbe also urged every man, woman and child to Purchase a Letter in a Sefer Torah. There are several Torah scrolls being written to unite Jewish people and protect Jewish life.

Letters for children can be purchased for only $1. Send your Hebrew name and your mother's Hebrew name plus $1 to:

"Children's Sefer Torah,"
P.O. Box 8
Kfar Chabad, 72915, Israel

or via the Internet, at: http://www.kidstorah.org


Next Tuesday, the 20th of Cheshvan (Nov. 6), we will be commemorating the birthday of Rabbi Sholom DovBer (5621/1860-5680/1920), the fifth Chabad-Lubavitch Rebbe, known as the Rebbe Rashab.

It is said that on a person's birthday, the "spiritual source of the soul shines powerfully." Therefore, it is important to understand what the central point of the Rebbe Rashab's leadership was, and how it differed from the other Chabad Rebbes.

The Rebbe explains how each of the Rebbes was characterized by a particular dimension that reflected his individual nature.

Chabad Chasidus is characterized by the ability to make the esoteric teachings of the Torah, which remained hidden from the majority of the Jewish community, accessible to every single Jew. The Rebbe Rashab was able to bring the teachings of Chabad Chasidus to an even more comprehensible level than his predecessors.

The Rebbe Rashab's teachings put a great emphasis on summarizing subject matter so that it could be more easily implemented into daily life. For this he is referred to by many as the "Rambam (Maimonides) of Chasidus," because he summarized Chasidus in the same way the Rambam summarized the Oral Law, making it comprehensible and giving it clear directions for every aspect of our conduct.

The lessons of the Rebbe Rashab are easily understood and are concluded with directions for the practical application of those lessons.

In 5657/1897 the Rebbe Rashab established a yeshivah, Tomchei Tmimim, and he was personally involved in every aspect of it, designing the curriculum, and asking for a detailed progress report on each student. He strove to raise both their standard of learning and their standard of behavior. It was a great honor to be accepted into the yeshivah, and its students were highly respected by the community.

The Rebbe Rashab published many of his teachings, which deal with improving one's character, how to prepare for prayer and the importance of prayer, and of studying Chasidus.

May we all benefit from his teachings.

* * *

There is a beautiful story concerning the Rebbe Rashab, illustrating the high esteem in which he held every Jew.

One of the Rebbe Rashab's followers, Reb Monye Monissohn, was a wealthy gem dealer. Once, when they were sitting together, the Rebbe spoke very highly about some simple, unlearned Jews.

"Why do you make such a fuss about them?" Reb Monye asked the Rebbe.

"Each one of them has many special and noble qualities," explained the Rebbe.

"I can't see any of these qualities," said Reb Monye.

The Rebbe remained silent. A while later, he asked Reb Monye if he had brought his package of diamonds with him. Indeed, Reb Monye had brought the diamonds, but asked the Rebbe if he could display them later, when they could be seen to their best advantage.

Later, Reb Monye took the Rebbe into a different room and arranged the diamonds for him to see. Reb Monye pointed to one gem in particular, extolling its beautiful color and quality.

"I can't see anything special in it," the Rebbe said.

"That is because you have to be a "maven" to know how to look at diamonds!" explained Reb Monye.

"Every Jew, too, is something beautiful and extra-ordinary," the Rebbe said. "But you have to be a "maven" to know how to look at him."


"About the coming of Moshiach, Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi (the first Rebbe of Chabad-Lubavitch), said that it will be written up in the newspapers.

"That is just an expression. The actual meaning is that every single Jew will be ready for the coming of Moshiach exactly as if it were written in the newspaper that Moshiach is already on the way!"

("Torat Sholom" of the Rebbe Rashab)


Jewish Women and Girls Light Shabbat Candles

For local candle lighting times:
consult your local Rabbi, Chabad-Lubavitch Center, or call: (718) 774-3000.
or: http://www.candlelightingtimes.org/shabbos

For a free candle lighting kit:
contact your local Chabad-Lubavitch Center.

For a listing of the Centers in your area:
In the USA, call: 1-800-Lubavitch (1-800-582-2848).

Times shown are for Metro NY - NJ

Friday, Nov. 2, Erev Shabbat Parshat Vayeira:

  • Light Shabbat Candles,(1) by 4:34 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 3, Shabbat Parshat Vayeira:

  • Shabbat ends at nightfall, at 5:35 p.m.


1. The Shabbat candles must be lit 18 minutes before sunset. It is prohibited and is a desecration of the Shabbat to light the candles after sunset.

Laws of Shabbat Candle Lighting for the Blind

Shabbat Candle Lighting Blessing

"Let There Be Light" - The Jewish Women's Guide to Lighting Shabbat Candles.

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